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Florida adds more than 12,000 coronavirus cases, 111 deaths on Sunday

Florida added 12,313 coronavirus cases Sunday, part of a surge of virus infection statewide.

Since March, 1,477,010 cases of coronavirus have been identified statewide. As of Sunday, nearly 16,000 cases were being announced per day, based on the weekly average.

On Sunday, the Florida Department of Health also announced 111 deaths, making it a total of 23,261 people in the state who have died from the virus.

The weekly death average increased slightly to about 136 deaths announced per day.

The state processed about 138,000 tests Saturday, with a daily positivity rate of 10.42 percent.

Vaccinations: As of Sunday, 558,326 people in Florida have been vaccinated against coronavirus, increasing by 44,026 from the day prior, according to the state Department of Health.

In Hillsborough, 26,777 people have been vaccinated; in Pinellas, 26,025; in Polk, 10,033; in Manatee, 10,445; in Pasco, 10,537; in Hernando, 4,963; and in Citrus, 4,367.

About 38,000 of the people vaccinated have received both the first and second vaccination dose.

Miami-Dade and Broward counties lead the state in having the most people vaccinated, followed by Orange, Palm Beach, and then Hillsborough and Pinellas.

Hospitalizations: About 7,500 people across Florida are hospitalized with a primary diagnosis of coronavirus, according to the Agency for Health Care Administration. About 1,500 of those patients are in the Tampa Bay area.

Statewide, about 23 percent of hospital beds and 19 percent of intensive-care unit beds are available. In Tampa Bay, about 22 percent of hospital beds and 16 percent of ICU beds are available. Pasco’s availability is low, with only about 8 percent of its ICU capacity open.

Cases that resulted in a hospitalization increased by 201 admissions.

Positivity: Florida’s average weekly positivity rate is about 14 percent, according to Johns Hopkins University. It is one of 47 states that does not meet the World Health Organization recommendation for a 5 percent positivity rate or below.

When the positivity rate is too high, it indicates there isn’t enough widespread testing to capture mild and asymptomatic cases. This allows the cases to go undetected and cause further community spread.

Local numbers: Tampa Bay added 2,147 coronavirus cases and eight deaths on Sunday.

Seven deaths were reported in Pinellas, and one was in Pasco.

Polk and Hillsborough lead the area with a 14 percent weekly positivity rate, followed by Pasco at 13 percent, Citrus and Hernando at 12 percent, Pinellas at 11 percent and Manatee at 10 percent.

As of the latest count, Hillsborough has 86,509 cases and 1,128 deaths; Pinellas has 50,978 cases and 1,136 deaths; Polk has 42,422 cases and 839 deaths; Manatee has 24,755 cases and 450 deaths; Pasco has 24,942 cases and 410 deaths; Hernando has 8,377 cases and 290 deaths; and Citrus has 7,469 cases and 289 deaths.

How fast is the number of Florida COVID-19 cases growing?

Is Florida’s coronavirus outbreak still growing?

Florida coronavirus cases by age group

Doctors say older people are at a greater risk to developing severe symptoms from COVID-19, which makes Florida especially vulnerable.

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